Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Their Brilliant Careers

Their Brilliant Careers: The Fantastic Lives of Sixteen Extraordinary Australian Writers
By Ryan O'Neill
Published by Lightning Books
Available in hardback
Forthcoming in paperback

We need more books like Their Brilliant Careers. This is a playful, addictive book of a biographies, interlinked, telling the stories of sixteen invented Australian writers.

O'Neill pulls the reader into an imaginary literary scene, blurring the lines between what we consider fiction and non-fiction.

Each story is full of eccentric characters with one customs officer seizing the works of Hemingway and Joyce, rewriting sections and then selling them to publishers while Rachel Deverall who discovers the secret source of Australian literature but suffers a dreadful ending before she can share her research.

O'Neill explores racism, political allegiances, family dramas and rival with the authors in their plotted biographies. Their Brilliant Careers is full of literary references that many book fans will love. Rand Washington, a right-wing writer of racist sci-fi and creator of a cult yet hugely successful has hints of L. Ron Hubbard

O'Neill builds up the layers of the authors with many appearing into each other's biographies, helping to build up a believable thriving literary scene. This brings an authentic feel to the book and could almost fool a casual reader that this is a book of real authors.

Social media has made people very curious about celebrities and we take joy in knowing more about their private lives. However, the internet allows people to curate a styled version of their lives. Their Brilliant Careers is refreshing in a world where people only show their polished sides of their lives as we get to see these authors in their raw state - messy, complicated, no escape from their shady sides of their lives.

Their Brilliant Careers is a witty, addictive, smart read, and this book will definitely not let you go once you start reading. People who love books, and knowing more about the people behind the words will enjoy this book. Their Brilliant Careers is available from your favourite bookshop.

Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy.

Sunday, 6 May 2018

April's Reading

April gave us a preview of the summer for like three days and then reminded us that England's natural habitat is watercolour grey skies, clouds and drizzle. But we're a couple of days into May and it's looking fantastic already - plus we have two bank holidays so is this the best month?

In April, I managed four books (not all pictured here) and I honestly thought it was going to be less because I've been busy with life - seeing friends, having a horrid cold, going to see the latest Avengers movie - I'm not going to give the plot away but this makes up for the middle of the road superhero movies we've had to suffer to get to this point. I really want to see it again! Not to mention going to the Royal Albert Hall with my sister to see Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets being played alongside an orchestra. We even managed a trip to the bookshop.

Right, on with the books...

Their Brilliant Careers - Ryan O'Neill
This playful book is a set of stories, linked, telling the story of 16 (invented) Australian writers. I found I couldn't put this book down as it really pulls you into the lives of these characters. A review of this is currently being written in my head so should appear here within the next week or so.

Norse Mythology - Neil Gaiman
Most of my Norse knowledge has faded over time and replaced by Marvel versions so it was great to read this collection of short stories exploring the Norse Gods.

The Cactus - Sarah Haywood
Fans of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman and The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion will love the protagonist, Susan Green. Just like the characters in Simsion's and Honeyman's novels, she is eccentric, annoying but sweet even before one paragraph has ended. She has a rigid life and it's about to unravel out of her control. This book shows readers how stepping outside our comfort zones can be more interesting and fun rather than living within self-imposed boundaries. You can read my review here.

Dark Places - Gillian Flynn (via kindle)
This was the second book for work's book club. I've never read any of Gillian Flynn's novels before and I've only watched Gone Girl on the telly so it was good to read this. Full of twists and turns, this tells the story of Libby Day as she reluctantly takes on the investigation to work out if it was her brother who murdered their mother and sisters over twenty years ago. I don't normally read thrillers so it was interesting to read this.

Preview on May... I've just given up reading a book for the first time this year. I just couldn't connect with the characters or the plot... so bye bye book. I've got too many unread books to be wasting my time on books that don't tickle me.